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VOLUME 5 , ISSUE 2 ( July-December, 2017 ) > List of Articles

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Study of Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose in Iron Deficiency Anemia in Women attending Gynecological Clinic: Safety and Efficacy

Priyankur Roy, Vineet Mishra, Khushali Gandhi, Shaheen Hokabaj

Citation Information : Roy P, Mishra V, Gandhi K, Hokabaj S. Study of Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose in Iron Deficiency Anemia in Women attending Gynecological Clinic: Safety and Efficacy. J South Asian Feder Menopause Soc 2017; 5 (2):71-74.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10032-1110

License: CC BY 3.0

Published Online: 01-12-2017

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2017; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Introduction

Several intravenous iron preparations are available for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Some of these require multiple small infusions to prevent labile iron reactions, while iron dextran (DEX) is associated with a risk of potentially serious anaphylactic reactions. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), a non-DEX intravenous iron, is an effective and a safe option, which can be administered in high single doses without serious adverse effects.

Objective

The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of FCM in the treatment of IDA in gynecological patients.

Materials and methods

It was an open, single-arm study including 442 women of age more than 18 years with definitive diagnosis of IDA and hemoglobin (Hb) between 4 and 11 gm% from December 2013 to November 2016. Out of these, 25 women were lost to follow-up and were excluded from the study. Intravenous FCM (500—1500 mg) was administered and the improvement in Hb levels and iron stores was assessed after 3 weeks of total dose infusion.

Results

Out of the 442 women, 417 women were included in the analysis. Most of the women were in the age group of 30 to 39 years. Most of the women had mild anemia as per the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Mean Hb levels significantly increased over a period of 3 weeks after FCM administration. Other parameters like total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin, and iron also had a significant improvement after FCM administration. No serious life-threatening adverse events were observed after FCM administration.

Conclusion

Intravenous FCM is an effective and a safe treatment option for IDA and has an advantage of single administration of high doses without serious adverse effects.

How to cite this article

Mishra V, Roy P, Gandhi K, Hokabaj S, Aggarwal R. Study of Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose in Iron Deficiency Anemia in Women attending Gynecological Clinic: Safety and Efficacy. J South Asian Feder Menopause Soc 2017;5(2):71-74.


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